1. Understanding Dating Abuse among Youth

Approximately 30% of high school students who are dating have experienced sexual and/or physical dating violence in their relationships within the past year.  Unfortunately, despite these staggeringly high numbers, less than 3% of young people seek help from adults like teachers, counselors or law enforcement. 

This 2-hour presentation will focus on the influence of youth’s developmental stage and limited relationship experience on the high incidence of dating abuse among youth. The Presenter will provide tips and insights into working more effectively with young survivors.  

This presentation will equip your staff to:

  1. Consider the factors that influence the high incidence of dating abuse among youth.

  2. Confront implicit biases that arise when working with youth.

  3. Define dating abuse and focus on youth-specific forms of abuse.

  4. Identify risk factors for experiencing dating abuse.

  5. Learn the barriers that prevent young survivors from seeking help.

  6. Develop strategies for better working with and for young survivors.

  7. Identify next steps for preventing and better addressing dating abuse among youth.


2. Working with Young Survivors

Approximately 30% of high school students who are dating have experienced sexual and/or physical dating violence in their relationships within the past year.  Unfortunately, despite these staggeringly high numbers, less than 3% of young people seek help from adults like teachers, counselors or law enforcement. 

This 2-hour presentation will focus on the influence of youth’s developmental stage and limited relationship experience on the high incidence of dating abuse among youth. The Presenter will provide tips and insights into working more effectively with young survivors, as well as background on young people’s rights under New York State law.  

This presentation will equip your staff to:

  1. Consider the factors that influence the high incidence of dating abuse among youth.

  2. Confront implicit biases that arise when working with youth.

  3. Learn the barriers that prevent young survivors from seeking help.

  4. Identify best practices for working with young survivors.

  5. Understand young survivor’s rights under the law.

**This presentation is ideal for youth-serving professionals who have a firm understanding of the dynamics of dating abuse/domestic violence but would like to increase their capacity around working specifically with young survivors.


 3. Working with Young LGBTQ Survivors

Of LGBTQ survivors in dating relationships, approximately 43% have experienced physical abuse and 23% have experienced sexual abuse.  Additionally, a striking 88.9% of trans youth have experienced physical dating abuse in their relationships. Despite these high numbers, LGBTQ young survivors meet a number of barriers to seeking help including the fear of “outing” their sexuality and/or gender identity, losing their online community, threats to safety from third parties and family, as well as homelessness.

This 2-hour presentation will focus on the influence of youth’s developmental stage, limited relationship experience, as well as gender identity and sexuality on the high incidence of dating abuse among LGBTQ youth.  The Presenter will provide tips and insights into working more effectively with LGBTQ young survivors, as well as background on young people’s rights under New York State law.  

This presentation will equip your staff to:

  1. Consider the factors that influence the high incidence of dating abuse among LGBTQ youth.

  2. Confront implicit biases that arise when working with LGBTQ youth.

  3. Learn the barriers that prevent LGBTQ young survivors from seeking help.

  4. Identify best practices for working with LGBTQ young survivors.

  5. Learn the laws that may support LGBTQ youth’s access to protection, housing, confidential health services and emancipation benefits.

  6. Understand the long-term impact of dating abuse on LGBTQ youth.

**This presentation is ideal for youth-serving professionals who have a firm understanding of the dynamics of dating abuse/domestic violence but would like to increase their capacity around working specifically with LGBTQ young survivors.


4. Understanding Tech Abuse among Youth

50% of young people aged 14-24 have experienced some form of digitally abusive behavior.

This 3-hour presentation will focus on the influence of youth’s developmental stage on the high incidence of tech abuse in dating relationships. The Presenter will provide tips and insights into working with young survivors of tech abuse with an eye on thoughtful and creative advocacy.  

This presentation will equip your staff to

  1. Clarify how technology can be harnessed for safety and used to abuse.

  2. Learn how to interview survivors in order to identify the forms of tech abuse.

  3. Identify the level of risk based on answers to identified questions.

  4. Safety plan with survivors with a focus on:

    1. identifying both risk and protective factors;

    2. collecting evidence; and

    3. offering possible legal and non-legal options.

  5. Understand emerging forms of tech abuse including spoofing, doxing, spyware and nonconsensual pornography.

  6. Recognize the deep impact of tech abuse.

**This training can be completed in 2.5 hours if participants have a firm understanding of the dynamics of dating abuse/domestic violence relationships.


Add-on Topics for Core Professionals Trainings

The below topics can be added to Day One’s core trainings and would require the additional time indicated.

  1. Safety planning with survivors of dating abuse (45 minutes)

    1. Learn what a safety plan is; Consider how a safety plan may differ if the survivor intends to stay with the abusive partner versus intends to stay; Discuss safety in the community, at home, at school, emotionally, and online; Understand the ways we share location information; and Identify risk and protective factors.

  2. Youth & the Law (45 minutes)

    1. Consider how complicated and inconsistent the laws related to young people are; Push participants to learn the laws so they can offer predictable services to youth; Discuss specifically: family court, the criminal path, immigration options, and basic needs; Explain the actual requirements around mandated reporting and dating abuse; and Outline youth’s access to confidential services and healthcare.

  3. Case Study (45 minutes)

    1. In a group activity, use a sample client case study to highlight the assumptions made about young survivors, barriers to seeking help, forms of abuse, role of technology in abuse, complicating legal issues, options for safety, and the impact of that abuse.

  4. Role Play (30-45 minutes)

    1. Through group work, observe/participate in a sample professionals’ interaction with a young survivor to increase comfort and skills with their own future interactions with youth survivors.  

  5. Domestic Sex Trafficking (1 hour)

    1. Discuss the intersection of dating abuse and the domestic sex trafficking of young people with a focus on: identifying how dating abuse can lead to experiences of trafficking, increasing empathy around survivors of trafficking; defining sex trafficking; understanding the process of grooming someone into the life of trafficking; and the overlap between dating abuse and domestic sex trafficking.