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Women's History Month

For women, particularly women of color, gender inequity can have life threatening costs. Women aged 16-24 experience the highest per capita rate of intimate partner violence, triple the national average, and the rates for women of color are the highest. But without women in positions of power, the problem is not addressed properly. This March, we acknowledge the women who are change-makers in the fight to end domestic violence, while realizing there is more work to be done.

How Adults Can Support Teens Experiencing Dating Violence

Talking about romantic relationships with parents or other adults can be uncomfortable, even when everything is going great, so it’s an even harder topic to bring up when they think there might be a problem.

Even when teens do have the courage to speak up, they are sometimes dismissed by the adults in their lives. It’s easy for adults to think that a teenager isn’t capable of real, serious violence or that the accuser is just being naive and dramatic.

If you’re a parent, teacher, coach, or other adult who interacts with teens, what can you do to help them when they’re experiencing violence in their relationship? How can you identify the signs, and how do you support them?

Pride Month: More than a Celebration

June is Pride Month, a time to celebrate and take pride in the LGBTQ+ community. It is a time to embrace the diverse orientations and identities that exist in our world and honor the people who struggled throughout history to get us here. And as we commemorate “love is love,” we must also acknowledge the difference between healthy and unhealthy love.

Mental Health Awareness Month: The Aftermath of Sexual Assault and Abuse

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. About 1 in 5 adults experiences some type of mental illness in a given year in the U.S. Sexual assault survivors are included in those numbers and often feel the mental health effects years after an assault. Although a survivor can eventually come to terms with their past and sometimes even receive legal justice, little can protect these men and women from the negative effects on their mental health.

Voices Against Violence: Survivors Coming Forward

During Sexual Assault Awareness Month it is important, to not only spread the word of the alarming prevalence of sexual assault, but to listen to the voices of survivors as well. Many use their voices to stand up against rape culture and to empower those recovering from similar situations. We encourage survivors to use their Voices Against Violence!

Types of Abuse

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a term used to describe harm or abuse occurring within an intimate relationship. IPV can be perpetuated by both current and former partners, and does not require sexual intimacy. While there are many different ways through which IPV manifests itself, it generally falls into five main categories.

Why Would Someone Stay in an Abusive Relationship?

For those who have not experienced abuse, it is difficult to understand why the survivor in an abusive relationship might stay with their abuser. However, leaving an abusive relationship is much easier said than done. Many survivors of abuse are stuck in cycles of emotional manipulation and physical or sexual violence and exploitation, which are difficult to escape from. The only people that truly understand the complexities of any given abusive relationship are those people in the relationship.

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