Women's History Month

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For generations, women have led social change, innovation, and development around the globe. Yet the fact is that their contributions are often not acknowledged at a rate that is representative of their participation. Women, femme and non-binary people are left out of the conversation in many ways, both explicitly and implicitly, in the ways they are unable to access power and privilege. They struggle to get a seat at the table.

For women, particularly women of color, gender inequity can have life threatening costs. Women aged 16-24 experience the highest per capita rate of intimate partner violence, triple the national average, and the rates for women of color are the highest. But without women in positions of power, the problem is not addressed properly. This March, we acknowledge the women who are change-makers in the fight to end domestic violence, while realizing there is more work to be done.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram to see our features on important women throughout the month of March.

Ending Domestic Violence

Domestic violence can affect anyone of any race, ethnicity, age, gender, or identity. However, studies have indicated that women are most likely to experience it. It makes sense, then, that women take a leading role in efforts to raise awareness and reduce domestic violence. Day One is proud to celebrate two women who are working to end gender inequity and intimate partner violence at our annual Voices Against Violence Gala, taking place on April 17th at the Grand Hyatt.

Abigail E. Disney

Abigail E. Disney

Abigail E. Disney is a filmmaker, philanthropist, and activist. In all endeavors, Abigail focuses on storytelling that fosters human understanding. She started and led Fork Films as CEO, inspired at the outset to tell the story of a brave group of women who used nonviolent protests to bring an end to Liberia’s long civil war. Along with renowned filmmaker Gini Reticker, she made the widely acclaimed Pray the Devil Back to Hell and created the subsequent five-part PBS series, Women, War & Peace. Since its founding, Fork Films has produced and funded over 100 documentary films, shining a light on some of the most challenging social issues of our time. Abigail is also the founder of Peace Is Loud, a non-profit that uses storytelling to advance social movements, focusing on women’s rights and gender justice.

Honey Heller

Honey Heller

Honey Heller is a Day One board member, founding chair, and passionate advocate on issues of dating abuse and domestic violence. Shortly after she and her husband, Keith, moved back to Manhattan in 2004, Honey was introduced to Day One. After attending one of Day One’s educational workshops at an Upper East Side high school, she decided she wanted to become more involved and joined the Board of Directors. Honey helped Day One incorporate as an independent nonprofit and became its first Board President.

Please join us in thanking these women, and all of the women worldwide who have advocated for women’s rights and an end to domestic violence for generations.

What Can I Do?

  • Support loved ones who have experienced sexual violence and provide them with resources if they are interested

  • Start a conversation on topics like sexual harassment and stay informed

  • Educate yourself on your rights with free guides from Day One

  • Donate to Day One and help us continue to provide education and direct services in New York City

  • Purchase a ticket to attend the Voices Against Violence Gala on April 17th!

  • Follow us on social media and online to stay up to date with our lifesaving work

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